Mohs Surgery

mohs surgery

Using a scalpel, a physician trained in Mohs surgery removes the visible tumor with a very thin layer of tissue around it. While the patient waits, this layer is sectioned, frozen, stained and mapped in detail, then checked under a microscope thoroughly. If cancer is still present in the depths or peripheries of this excised surrounding tissue, the procedure is repeated on the corresponding area of the body still containing tumor cells until the last layer viewed under the microscope is cancer-free. Mohs surgery spares the greatest amount of healthy tissue, reduces the rate of local recurrence, and has the highest overall cure rate (94-99 percent) of any treatment for SCC. It is often used on tumors that have recurred, are poorly demarcated, or are in hard-to-treat, critical areas around the eyes, nose, lips, ears, neck, hands and feet. After tumor removal, the wound may be allowed to heal naturally or may be reconstructed immediately; the cosmetic outcome is usually excellent.

Excisional Surgery

The physician uses a scalpel to remove the entire growth, along with a surrounding border of apparently normal skin as a safety margin. The wound around the surgical site is then closed with sutures (stitches). The excised tissue specimen is then sent to the laboratory for microscopic examination to verify that all cancerous cells have been removed. A repeat excision may be necessary on a subsequent occasion if evidence of skin cancer is found in the specimen. The accepted cure rate for primary tumors with this technique is about 92 percent. This rate drops to 77 percent for recurrent squamous cell carcinomas.

Curettage and Electrodesiccation

The growth is scraped off with a curette (an instrument with a sharp, ring-shaped tip), and burning heat produced by an electrocautery needle destroys residual tumor and controls bleeding. This procedure is typically repeated a few times, a deeper layer of tissue being scraped and burned each time to help ensure that no tumor cells remain. It can produce cure rates approaching those of surgical excision for superficially invasive squamous cell carcinomas without high-risk characteristics. However, it is not recommended  for any invasive or aggressive SCCs, those in high-risk or difficult sites, such as the eyelids, genitalia, lips and ears, or other sites that would be left with cosmetically undesirable results, since the procedure leaves a sizable, hypopigmented scar.

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3 Convenient Locations In Your Area

lakebluff img

925 Sherwood Dr,
Lake Bluff, IL 60044

Mon: 9:30am to 7:00 pm
Tues: 9:00am to 5:30 pm
Wed: 9:30am to 5:30 pm
Thu-Fri: 9:30am to 5:00 pm
Sat: Varies

wilmette img

3612 Lake Ave. #2B,
Wilmette, IL 60091-1000

Wed: 9:30 am -5:30 pm
Thu: 9:00am - 5:00 pm

libertyville img

1850 W. Winchester,Suite 106
Libertyville, IL 60048

Tues: 9:30 am - 6:00 pm
Wed: 9:30 am - 5:30 pm
Thu: 9:30 am - 5:00 pm

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